Namandje Bumpus, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Clinical Pharmacology and of pharmacology and molecular sciences, became the associate dean for institutional and student equity, beginning July 1, 2015.

Dr. Bumpus’ two main areas of focus include: institutional equity and academic achievement for graduate biomedical students, with special attention paid to helping vulnerable students bridge the opportunity gap and succeed at the school of medicine.

Dr. Bumpus will work to create a culture of inclusion, diversity and cultural competency, with an emphasis on—but not limited to—supporting research scientists at Johns Hopkins. She will help provide insight into institutional equity issues that may prevent Johns Hopkins from fully engaging its diverse scientific community and offer approaches to resolve these challenges. Dr. Bumpus will also help advance the careers of graduate biomedical students, and serve as an advisor and advocate to motivate students toward academic achievement. She will implement initiatives designed to create an interconnected culture that values inclusion, growth and the well-being of graduate students, including those that belong to historically marginalized and/or underrepresented groups.

Dr. Bumpus earned a Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of Michigan in 2007 and trained as a postdoctoral fellow at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California. She joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in July 2010. Her research program is focused on defining the contribution of drug metabolism to the pharmacology and toxicology of drugs used to treat and prevent HIV infection.

Among her many important positions, Dr. Bumpus is a member of the university’s Diversity Leadership Council. She serves as a counselor for the American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics’ Division for Drug Metabolism. She is also a member of the Drug Metabolism and Disposition editorial board and is a regular member of the National Institutes of Health’s Xenobiotic and Nutrient Disposition and Action Study Section.

 

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