The fourth and penultimate session of the Journeys in Medicine series brought medical professionals and community leaders together to discuss the relationship between clinicians and researchers and the community, how to improve it and how far Hopkins has already come in caring for its patients and community members.

On July 15, moderator Dr. Lisa Cooper, professor and director of the Johns Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities, joined the following panelists to discuss their experiences with the healthcare system and the community and lessons they have learned in the process.

Panelists:

  • Dr. Kimberly Gudzune, assistant professor and core faculty of the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research
  • Rev. Debra Hickman, co-founder and CEO of Sisters Together and Reaching, Inc. (STAR)
  • Dr. Michael Albert, regional medical director of the Baltimore/North region of Johns Hopkins Community Physicians
  • Michelle Simmons, patient and family advisor for the Johns Hopkins Medicine Community Advisory Board of the Johns Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities
  • Dr. Carlton Haywood, assistant professor, core faculty of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and the Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research
  • Brian Taltoan, school administrator of Baltimore County Public Schools

A major theme among comments from both members of medical profession and the community showed the importance of communication between both sides. Researchers and community leaders alike have seen the negative effects that lack of communication can have; causing the community to be skeptical of researchers and researchers to struggle to gain the community’s trust. Taking steps as simple as sharing the results of the research studies or engaging community leaders can go a long way in building a sense of trust between both sides. With volumes of patients increasing, added communication from clinicians could help soothe patients’ frustrations with longer wait times. Panelists also agreed that a mutual respect and an understanding of cultural differences is paramount in developing an effective bond between healthcare workers and members of the community.

Please join us for the fifth and final session of the Journeys in Medicine series on Wednesday, July 22 from noon to 1 p.m. in the Hurd Hall where we will review all of the valuable information gathered from the sessions and brainstorm what Hopkins can do to partner with the community and meet some of the needs described during the series.

To RSVP, please click here: https://jhmi.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_9MOiMHJskBSiRdH

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