April is Sarcoidosis Awareness Month

Today, it is estimated that 175,000 people in the U.S. have sarcoidosis, with an estimated 1.2 million individuals living with the disease worldwide. Despite increasing advances in research, sarcoidosis remains difficult to diagnose with limited treatment options and no known cure.

For more than 50 years, the Johns Hopkins Sarcoidosis Program has provided specialized care for patients with known or suspected sarcoidosis. They have grown from treating dozens of patients each year to more than one thousand. As part of this growth, they have recently expanded to a second location in the Falls Concourse at Johns Hopkins Health Care & Surgery Center at Green Spring Station. They will also continue to see patients in the Asthma & Allergy Center on the Johns Hopkins Bayview campus. 

Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease that is most common in the lungs; however, it can affect other organs, such as the heart, brain, eyes, kidneys and liver. Treatment for the disease is as unique as the person who was diagnosed with it. For that reason, the Johns Hopkins Sarcoidosis Program has established a multidisciplinary team of experts who specialize in treating the organs that sarcoidosis affects.

Meet the Team (members of the DOM are in bold):

Pulmonary/Generalists:

  • Stacey Ann Brown, M.D., MPH, assistant professor in Pulmonary
  • Ed Chen, M.D., assistant professor in Pulmonary
  • Kayla Nyakinye, CRNP 
  • Michelle Sharp, M.D., MHS, assistant professor in Pulmonary

Cardiology:

Neurology:

Pulmonary Hypertension:

Dermatology:

Nephrology:

GI/Liver:

  • Michelle Ma, M.D., assistant professor in Gastroenterology

Additional Specialties:

  • Bone Metabolism 
  • Ophthalmology 
  • Rheumatology